Perseids meteor shower in Northern California peak viewing times

WHAT THESE EVENTS ARE AND WHY ONE MAY OBSCURE THE OTHER. >> WE HAVE TWO EVENTS GOING ON. YOU PROBABLY SAW ONE OF THEM DEVELOPING THIS MORNING. I DID AS I CAME INTO WORK. YOU SAW THE MOON. IT WAS LARGE AND YELLOW. THIS IS THE AUGUST FULL MOON TAKING PLACE THURSDAY NIGHT AND THAT’S GOING TO BE WHEN IT WILL PEAK, IN THE EVENING. IT IS ALSO A SUPERMOON, THE FOURTH IN A ROW — IT IS ALSO A SUPERMOON, THE FOURTH IN A ROW. THEY ARE NOT UNUSUAL, BUT IT DOES MAKE FOR A BRIGHTER MOON. IT MAKES FOR A LARGER MOON, 6% LARGER, 16% BRIGHTER THAN YOUR AVERAGE MOON. THAT WILL OFFSET THE OTHER EVENT TAKING PLACE, THE PERSEID METEOR SHOWER AT ITS PEAK. IF YOU ARE GOING TO BE LOOKING FOR METEORS, LOOK TOWARDS THE NORTHEAST NEAR CASIO — CASSIOPEIA. YOU WILL WANT TO WAIT UNTIL HE GETS DARKER. YOU WILL BE UP AGAINST THE MOON. WE COULD SEE 25 TO 100 PER HOUR IN SPOTS, BUT BECAUSE THE MOON WILL BE SO BRIGHT, THE NUMBER WILL PROBABLY BE CUT IN HALF. THE PERSEID METEOR SHOWER IS ALSO BIG ON PUTTING UP WHAT’S CALLED FIREBALLS. WHEN YOU HAVE METEORS BURNING UP, THEY ARE TYPICALLY ABOUT THE SIZE OF GRAINS OF SAND. THIS ONE HAS AN ABNORMAL NUMBER OF ONE’S MAY BE THE SIZE OF SKITTLES — OF ONES MAY BE THE SIZE O

Here’s when your best chances are to catch the Perseid meteor shower in Northern California

It is time for what is typically the biggest meteor shower of the year — the Perseids. Unfortunately, this year, it will be competing with a very bright moon which could cut the number of meteors visible to the naked eye in half. Friday night into Saturday morning is when the Perseid meteor shower reaches its peak. Look to the northeast under the constellation Cassiopeia, which looks like a “W” in the NE sky.Depending on how dark the sky is in your location, rates of 25 to 100 meteors per hour are possible, but because of the bright moon, rates will decrease for everyone.Fortunately, the Perseids are also known for having some of the brighter meteors, called fireballs, which should cut through the additional moonlight allowing for a nice display to view.

It is time for what is typically the biggest meteor shower of the year — the Perseids.

Unfortunately, this year, it will be competing with a very bright moon which could cut the number of meteors visible to the naked eye in half.

Friday night into Saturday morning is when the Perseid meteor shower reaches its peak. Look to the northeast under the constellation Cassiopeia, which looks like a “W” in the NE sky.

Depending on how dark the sky is in your location, rates of 25 to 100 meteors per hour are possible, but because of the bright moon, rates will decrease for everyone.

Fortunately, the Perseids are also known for having some of the brighter meteors, called fireballs, which should cut through the additional moonlight allowing for a nice display to view.

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